Discussion:
More great cover versions of songs
(too old to reply)
Dr. Zontar
2007-09-07 12:31:47 UTC
Permalink
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.

I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.

I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.

I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".

- Rich
Flinstoneyerfired
2007-09-07 12:49:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.

Mike
RichL
2007-09-07 12:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!
Flinstoneyerfired
2007-09-07 15:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses. There was some arguably great
music made during "grunge's" heyday, but in reality, was there any
similarity between Soundgarden and Nirvana. There were a lot of bands
lumped into that genre that were disimilar.

Mike
RichL
2007-09-07 16:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by RichL
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses. There was some arguably great
music made during "grunge's" heyday, but in reality, was there any
similarity between Soundgarden and Nirvana. There were a lot of bands
lumped into that genre that were disimilar.
Yeah, I agree.
Gattman
2007-09-07 22:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses.
"Grunge" is an industry- and media-manufactured label. The artists
generally considered themselves punk rock. (Except for the bands that were
glam, such as Alice in Chains.) You didn't have to follow a certain
formula, you just had to show up and play loud-ass original music and if the
media decided you were grunge, there wasn't anything you could really do
about it except break up.

Some killer stuff survived it, like Sky Cries Mary. I'm going to see them
in about four hours.

-c
Portland
Atomic Punk
2007-10-04 22:52:18 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 7 Sep 2007 15:26:05 -0700, "Gattman"
Post by Gattman
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses.
"Grunge" is an industry- and media-manufactured label.
"Grunge" is for shithead fanboys like you who idolize losers like Kurt
Cobain.

Les Cargill
2007-09-07 23:25:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by RichL
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses. There was some arguably great
music made during "grunge's" heyday, but in reality, was there any
similarity between Soundgarden and Nirvana. There were a lot of bands
lumped into that genre that were disimilar.
Mike
It means roughly "any guitar act that got signed after SubPop broke the
early Seattle acts." Bob Wills and Hank Williams don't sound that much
the same, but they only put out so many buckets.

--
Les Cargill
Lewis
2007-09-08 06:13:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Les Cargill
It means roughly "any guitar act that got signed after SubPop broke the
early Seattle acts." Bob Wills and Hank Williams don't sound that much
the same, but they only put out so many buckets.
--
Les Cargill- Hide quoted text -
Well put Les.. Mr. Analogy strikes again.

L.
Keith Adams
2007-09-08 07:42:29 UTC
Permalink
Yeah and Hanks bucket had a hole in it. He couldnt buy no beer. But he
stood up on a mountain and looked down at the sea. Seen the crabs and the
fishes. Doing the bee bop bee
Post by Les Cargill
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by RichL
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
"Grunge" was a label that was supposed to describe a type of music,
but i think it was really a marketing term devised to herald a new era
of music to be consumed by the masses. There was some arguably great
music made during "grunge's" heyday, but in reality, was there any
similarity between Soundgarden and Nirvana. There were a lot of bands
lumped into that genre that were disimilar.
Mike
It means roughly "any guitar act that got signed after SubPop broke the
early Seattle acts." Bob Wills and Hank Williams don't sound that much the
same, but they only put out so many buckets.
--
Les Cargill
Les Cargill
2007-09-07 23:24:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
It's refreshing to see a musician who's work almost defines a genre but who
is willing to go outside that genre to find his muse. A nice antidote to
some of the recent "grunge destroyed music" posts!
Whatever it was, Cash was it first. They throw the "legend" word
around, but Cash is one - like Davy Crockett or something.

--
Les Cargill
Sasquatch
2007-09-07 21:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
Mike
JC has covered a lot of other people's songs. He had an ability to take
someone else's tune and make it his own. But the funny thing about 'Hurt' is
that I really think it described how he felt at that point in his life. I
think he felt that song like he did no other at the time.

Sasquatch
Daniel Dreibelbis
2007-09-08 00:59:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
that album is great. Yes, Petty's Heartbreakers are on that album,
along with Marty Stuart - he and Mike Campbell made a great team. I also
loved the cover of Petty's own "Southern Accents", as well as the
breakneck versions of "Country Boy" and "I've Been Everywhere".

You've gotta read the liner notes to that album, they're hilarious.
Particularly the story about the time he and Jerry Lee Lewis got ahold
of an industrial vacuum cleaner on the road, then used it in a hotel
room to suck up everything - and I mean everything - as a horrified June
looked on!
--
Dan Dreibelbis, Guitar Nerd - Better Living Through Home Recording
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=121942
Current Song - "Gutbucket"
and a new YouTube vid:

Flinstoneyerfired
2007-09-08 14:12:06 UTC
Permalink
On Sep 7, 8:59 pm, Daniel Dreibelbis
Post by Daniel Dreibelbis
Post by Flinstoneyerfired
I know it's already been mentioned, but- JC's version of NIN's "Hurt"
blew me right away when I first heard it. I think that there's an art
to recognizing that a song is a good song and then filtering it
through one's own creative process to bring something new to the
table. "Rusty Cage" also blew me away when I first heard it- I think
Tom Petty's band backed up JC on "Unchained" which brought us "Rusty
Cage", IIRC.
that album is great. Yes, Petty's Heartbreakers are on that album,
along with Marty Stuart - he and Mike Campbell made a great team. I also
loved the cover of Petty's own "Southern Accents", as well as the
breakneck versions of "Country Boy" and "I've Been Everywhere".
You've gotta read the liner notes to that album, they're hilarious.
Particularly the story about the time he and Jerry Lee Lewis got ahold
of an industrial vacuum cleaner on the road, then used it in a hotel
room to suck up everything - and I mean everything - as a horrified June
looked on!
--
Dan Dreibelbis, Guitar Nerd - Better Living Through Home Recordinghttp://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=121942
Current Song - "Gutbucket"
and a new YouTube http://youtu.be/584Ou-0LXzU
That album is responsible for me becoming (probably a lot of
people,actually) a pretty big fan of JC. There isn't a bad track on
that album. I recommend it highly. I haven't read the liner notes, but
after reading your post, I'm gonna check 'em out.

Mike
buzz
2007-09-10 07:06:02 UTC
Permalink
How's about this for a cover?

Ry Cooder doing JC's Get Rhythm.


Lewis
2007-09-21 05:28:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by buzz
How's about this for a cover?
Ry Cooder doing JC's Get Rhythm.
http://youtu.be/SISps5dIhE0
Damn right buzz..... I still think that the Get Rhythm album is Ry's
best. And his take on the title track is mind boggling, especially
when you run it up against the original. The touch and attack on his
slide work, the Pip-like background vocals, ... I'd have to say that
that album has been the single biggest influence on my playing in the
last ... well however many years ago it was released. And I still
think that "Women will rule the world" is the best anti-feminist song
ever written.

lewis
Keith Adams
2007-09-07 21:12:25 UTC
Permalink
I've dug JC's work from his early days and everything in between. Even
after all of the great stuff that he'd put out it seems to me that at the
end he was really starting to understand what he was all about. Pain will do
that to a person. He'd known pain from an early age but only the loss of a
child could match the pain of growing old.
You've just had too many people you love die and leave you more alone after
each ones passing. Once June was gone I knew the second I heard the news
that Johnny Cash wasnt long for this world.
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
Les Cargill
2007-09-07 23:22:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
That is Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers backing him up. I think
the last time I heard a DJ get excited on the radio was when they
announced that song ( it's from '96 ).

If you haven't found Cash's cover of Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt",
go YouTube it. But be careful - it's one powerful video.

--
Les Cargill
Keith Adams
2007-09-08 07:33:20 UTC
Permalink
I cant hardly watch it all the way through Les. It just hits something
inside of me thats far worse than mere loneliness or sorrow.
Post by Dr. Zontar
This is a follow-up to the covers thread a few days ago.
I just discovered Johnny Cash's version of Soundgarden's "Rusty Cage".
OMG, it totally slayed me. I love how it starts with just acoustic
guitar. Like a simple country blues. When the overdriven electric and
drums kick in, it's amazing. Country and Grunge, and it works.
I'm a big fan of Chris Cornell, and love his vocals on the original.
But Cash's gruff baritone serves the song really well. The sparse
arrangement actually highlights the lyrics, which are oddly poetic.
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
- Rich
Qzectb
2007-09-21 17:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
I love it when someone gets inside a song, and totally makes it their
own. I haven't heard such a great reworking of a song since Hendrix's
"All Along the Watchtower".
Here's one that fits the above description: Bill Parson's acoustic
cover of Thomas Dolby's "She Blinded Me with Science". Totally
different, very effective - seductive even. I like it at least as
much as I dislike the original.
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