Discussion:
Gary Moore's tone
(too old to reply)
The Interceptor
2011-02-16 11:37:03 UTC
Permalink
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.

I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.

His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.

The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.

All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.

What are the thoughts out there?

Brett
TheChris
2011-02-16 12:02:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
From watching that video (with the Tiny Terror) I didn't think the tone was that
hard to get - sounded like what it was - a guitar into an overdriven amp. I
think his playing made it sound great, but, I'm pretty sure everybody could get
his tones..
rct
2011-02-16 13:07:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChris
From watching that video (with the Tiny Terror) I didn't think the tone was that
hard to get - sounded like what it was - a guitar into an overdriven amp. I
think his playing made it sound great, but, I'm pretty sure everybody could get
his tones..
So true dat, most guitar players on record or live in front of you are
doing just that, getting "tones" that anybody can get. Each guitar
player sounds different using those "tones", that's the hardest thing
to get a new guitar player to understand.

rct
Jim
2011-02-16 17:46:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
I ordered the "One Night in Dublin" blu-ray the day he died, and watched
it recently. There was a shot of his pedal board. I don't recall
seeing the Guv'nor (but will look for it next time I watch), but I
clearly saw the Ibanez TS10. He was playing into DSL's and a Soldano, I
believe.

BTW, it's a pretty good blu-ray, at least if you have a full HD TV and a
sound system that will do DTS Master Audio. There are plenty of shots
of his playing.
Post by The Interceptor
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues
For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his
hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some
better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal
is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is
probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of
the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
Jim
2011-02-16 17:50:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues
For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his
hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some
better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal
is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is
probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of
the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
Forgot to add... He was playing a couple of Les Pauls, appeared to be
vintage. I noticed that his neck pickup had the screws in the bridge
orientation. When I experimented with my vintage SG, I put a JB in the
neck position, but flipped it over so that the screws looked right.
Guess I didn't need to do that. (It also has a Seymour Duncan
Distortion in the bridge, so both selections are high output.)
Jim
2011-02-16 18:15:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues
For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his
hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some
better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal
is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is
probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of
the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
Forgot to add... He was playing a couple of Les Pauls, appeared to be
vintage. I noticed that his neck pickup had the screws in the bridge
orientation. When I experimented with my vintage SG, I put a JB in the
neck position, but flipped it over so that the screws looked right.
Guess I didn't need to do that. (It also has a Seymour Duncan Distortion
in the bridge, so both selections are high output.)
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected. But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
rct
2011-02-16 18:23:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
uh...that's a pretty famous guitar of his that Peter Greene gave him
that had a reversed front pickup. I believe I once read that it
wasn't out of phase, but magnetically opposite, if that makes sense.
Ask Lindy or Joe Barden, they can explain it. Or that Seymour guy.
Post by Jim
 But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
Yeah, lots have, by accident and on purpose. Nobody sounds like Gary
Moore though.

rct
Tony Done
2011-02-16 20:28:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
uh...that's a pretty famous guitar of his that Peter Greene gave him
that had a reversed front pickup. I believe I once read that it
wasn't out of phase, but magnetically opposite, if that makes sense.
Ask Lindy or Joe Barden, they can explain it. Or that Seymour guy.
Post by Jim
But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
Yeah, lots have, by accident and on purpose. Nobody sounds like Gary
Moore though.

rct

Just for the technically minded, "magnetically opposite" is the normal
situation for humbucking strat single coils, where the middle pickup has the
opposite magnetic orientation to the neck and bridge. They are still
normally wired in phase, but the two and four switch positions give
humbucking. The only reason I can see for doing it in a pair of humbuckers
is if you want to coil tap and select, say, the two screw pole coils as a
humbucking pair in the middle+coil tap switch position. This in itself
assumes that the screw poles on the two pickups are wound in the same
direction, eg clockwise. If there is any other reason I would be interested
to know.

Tony D
Squier
2011-02-17 07:24:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by rct
Post by Jim
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
uh...that's a pretty famous guitar of his that Peter Greene gave him
that had a reversed front pickup. I believe I once read that it
wasn't out of phase, but magnetically opposite, if that makes sense.
Ask Lindy or Joe Barden, they can explain it. Or that Seymour guy.
Post by Jim
But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
Yeah, lots have, by accident and on purpose. Nobody sounds like Gary
Moore though.
rct
Just for the technically minded, "magnetically opposite" is the normal
situation for humbucking strat single coils, where the middle pickup has the
opposite magnetic orientation to the neck and bridge. They are still
normally wired in phase, but the two and four switch positions give
humbucking. The only reason I can see for doing it in a pair of humbuckers
is if you want to coil tap and select, say, the two screw pole coils as a
humbucking pair in the middle+coil tap switch position. This in itself
assumes that the screw poles on the two pickups are wound in the same
direction, eg clockwise. If there is any other reason I would be interested
to know.
Tony D
A couple of things with humbuckers - not all humbuckers have equal
sides to them. For example - a humbucker at 8.5k might have both
coming in at 4.25k but there are a lot of makers that will make
one side at 5k and the other at 3.5k. (obviously both are reverse
wound from each other and in phase)
It will still buck the hum (but not quite as well as an exact match)
but it will give the humbucker a different voicing than a regular 8.5k pickup
dure to the mismatched coils.

So - when you coil tap you might want to check each coil in a humbucker
for its output. Again - most are matching - but some have a hotter side
than the other - something to check. And this way you can determine which
coil you want to tap.

On to the next thing. In a 2 humbucker guitar (or even H-S-H with
a single coil sandwiched in the middle) and you are going to coil
tap one or both humbuckers. It pays to check the polarity of which
coil you are going to tap if you want it to be reverse wound when
used in a position where the coil tapped humbucker is paired up with
another single coil or another tapped humbucker.

This way you can choose the tapped coil to be reverse wound from
the other tapped coil in the other humbucker giving you a noiseless position.
When you tap a humbucker it is essentially a humming single coil. You lose
the 'humbucking'. And if you tap another humbucker and then use the 'in between'
pickup positing you might have 2 humming single coils -- if you chose each coil
to tap as reverse wound from each other then the selection of both tapped
humbuckers would be humbucking (just like a reverse wound in-between humbucking selection
in a Strat or Tele). And of course - you can get a tonal shift by choosing to
tap the inner or outer coil as one coil closer to the neck might produce a better
or worse sound than the coil closer to the brudge. etc and etc.

So it does make a difference whether you tap the inner or outer coil
in a humbucker based on output desired (if the coils are not exact matches)
and the polarity (if you need a coil tap reverse wound from another single coil
or coil tap bucker) so you can have a humbucking position when both pups are selected.

Hopefully this makes some sense. Simply tapping a coil on a humbucker
mindlessly without some thought is easy enough - but if you think it through
then you can tap the coil (with 4 wire lead) and solder it in and do it once and be done
and be pleased with the tones and the coil you decided to tap.

that's my 2 1/2 cents.
Tony Done
2011-02-17 19:36:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Post by rct
Post by Jim
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
uh...that's a pretty famous guitar of his that Peter Greene gave him
that had a reversed front pickup. I believe I once read that it
wasn't out of phase, but magnetically opposite, if that makes sense.
Ask Lindy or Joe Barden, they can explain it. Or that Seymour guy.
Post by Jim
But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
Yeah, lots have, by accident and on purpose. Nobody sounds like Gary
Moore though.
rct
Just for the technically minded, "magnetically opposite" is the normal
situation for humbucking strat single coils, where the middle pickup has the
opposite magnetic orientation to the neck and bridge. They are still
normally wired in phase, but the two and four switch positions give
humbucking. The only reason I can see for doing it in a pair of humbuckers
is if you want to coil tap and select, say, the two screw pole coils as a
humbucking pair in the middle+coil tap switch position. This in itself
assumes that the screw poles on the two pickups are wound in the same
direction, eg clockwise. If there is any other reason I would be interested
to know.
Tony D
A couple of things with humbuckers - not all humbuckers have equal
sides to them. For example - a humbucker at 8.5k might have both
coming in at 4.25k but there are a lot of makers that will make
one side at 5k and the other at 3.5k. (obviously both are reverse
wound from each other and in phase)
It will still buck the hum (but not quite as well as an exact match)
but it will give the humbucker a different voicing than a regular 8.5k pickup
dure to the mismatched coils.
So - when you coil tap you might want to check each coil in a humbucker
for its output. Again - most are matching - but some have a hotter side
than the other - something to check. And this way you can determine which
coil you want to tap.
On to the next thing. In a 2 humbucker guitar (or even H-S-H with
a single coil sandwiched in the middle) and you are going to coil
tap one or both humbuckers. It pays to check the polarity of which
coil you are going to tap if you want it to be reverse wound when
used in a position where the coil tapped humbucker is paired up with
another single coil or another tapped humbucker.
This way you can choose the tapped coil to be reverse wound from
the other tapped coil in the other humbucker giving you a noiseless position.
When you tap a humbucker it is essentially a humming single coil. You lose
the 'humbucking'. And if you tap another humbucker and then use the 'in between'
pickup positing you might have 2 humming single coils -- if you chose each coil
to tap as reverse wound from each other then the selection of both tapped
humbuckers would be humbucking (just like a reverse wound in-between humbucking selection
in a Strat or Tele). And of course - you can get a tonal shift by choosing to
tap the inner or outer coil as one coil closer to the neck might produce a better
or worse sound than the coil closer to the brudge. etc and etc.
So it does make a difference whether you tap the inner or outer coil
in a humbucker based on output desired (if the coils are not exact matches)
and the polarity (if you need a coil tap reverse wound from another single coil
or coil tap bucker) so you can have a humbucking position when both pups are selected.
Hopefully this makes some sense. Simply tapping a coil on a humbucker
mindlessly without some thought is easy enough - but if you think it through
then you can tap the coil (with 4 wire lead) and solder it in and do it once and be done
and be pleased with the tones and the coil you decided to tap.
that's my 2 1/2 cents.
Thanks, I hadn't considered uneven coils. My main concern the few times I've
tried it has been the use the screw pole coils so that I can fine tune the
string-to-string balance. For humbucking in the coil tap middle switch
position, this requires that one of the screw poles is North and the other
is South. The phase thing can be sorted out by switching the wires from that
coil between hot and earth, though if the pickups are a matched set (or
hopefully all pickups from the same maker) the factory wiring recommendation
will be in phase. For two humbuckers with a total of four coils I have to
sit down with a piece of paper to figure out all the phase options.

Tony D
Squier
2011-02-18 03:09:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Done
Post by Squier
Post by rct
Post by Jim
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
uh...that's a pretty famous guitar of his that Peter Greene gave him
that had a reversed front pickup. I believe I once read that it
wasn't out of phase, but magnetically opposite, if that makes sense.
Ask Lindy or Joe Barden, they can explain it. Or that Seymour guy.
Post by Jim
But come to think of it, I did the same
thing when I re-oriented the bridge p'up to look like a neck.
Yeah, lots have, by accident and on purpose. Nobody sounds like Gary
Moore though.
rct
Just for the technically minded, "magnetically opposite" is the normal
situation for humbucking strat single coils, where the middle pickup has the
opposite magnetic orientation to the neck and bridge. They are still
normally wired in phase, but the two and four switch positions give
humbucking. The only reason I can see for doing it in a pair of humbuckers
is if you want to coil tap and select, say, the two screw pole coils as a
humbucking pair in the middle+coil tap switch position. This in itself
assumes that the screw poles on the two pickups are wound in the same
direction, eg clockwise. If there is any other reason I would be interested
to know.
Tony D
A couple of things with humbuckers - not all humbuckers have equal
sides to them. For example - a humbucker at 8.5k might have both
coming in at 4.25k but there are a lot of makers that will make
one side at 5k and the other at 3.5k. (obviously both are reverse
wound from each other and in phase)
It will still buck the hum (but not quite as well as an exact match)
but it will give the humbucker a different voicing than a regular 8.5k pickup
dure to the mismatched coils.
So - when you coil tap you might want to check each coil in a humbucker
for its output. Again - most are matching - but some have a hotter side
than the other - something to check. And this way you can determine which
coil you want to tap.
On to the next thing. In a 2 humbucker guitar (or even H-S-H with
a single coil sandwiched in the middle) and you are going to coil
tap one or both humbuckers. It pays to check the polarity of which
coil you are going to tap if you want it to be reverse wound when
used in a position where the coil tapped humbucker is paired up with
another single coil or another tapped humbucker.
This way you can choose the tapped coil to be reverse wound from
the other tapped coil in the other humbucker giving you a noiseless position.
When you tap a humbucker it is essentially a humming single coil. You lose
the 'humbucking'. And if you tap another humbucker and then use the 'in between'
pickup positing you might have 2 humming single coils -- if you chose each coil
to tap as reverse wound from each other then the selection of both tapped
humbuckers would be humbucking (just like a reverse wound in-between
humbucking selection
in a Strat or Tele). And of course - you can get a tonal shift by choosing to
tap the inner or outer coil as one coil closer to the neck might produce a better
or worse sound than the coil closer to the brudge. etc and etc.
So it does make a difference whether you tap the inner or outer coil
in a humbucker based on output desired (if the coils are not exact matches)
and the polarity (if you need a coil tap reverse wound from another single coil
or coil tap bucker) so you can have a humbucking position when both pups are selected.
Hopefully this makes some sense. Simply tapping a coil on a humbucker
mindlessly without some thought is easy enough - but if you think it through
then you can tap the coil (with 4 wire lead) and solder it in and do it
once and be done
and be pleased with the tones and the coil you decided to tap.
that's my 2 1/2 cents.
Thanks, I hadn't considered uneven coils. My main concern the few times I've
tried it has been the use the screw pole coils so that I can fine tune the
string-to-string balance. For humbucking in the coil tap middle switch
position, this requires that one of the screw poles is North and the other
is South. The phase thing can be sorted out by switching the wires from that
coil between hot and earth, though if the pickups are a matched set (or
hopefully all pickups from the same maker) the factory wiring recommendation
will be in phase. For two humbuckers with a total of four coils I have to
sit down with a piece of paper to figure out all the phase options.
Tony D
there are easily over 35 possible combinations with 2 humbuckers (considering
that with coil taps you are actually looking at the possibilites of 4 single coils
which just happened to be arranged in a 2 humbucker setting).
In and out of phase, which coils get tapped inner/outer, parallel or series
combinations... you'll have all sorts of toggles and push pull pots
littering your guitar. In a live setting, it's a nightmare (if for example
you want to get from one sound to the next but try switching and pushing in
a pot and then tripping a toggle or two all within a beat gooing from rhythm
to lead). You wind up just using simple settings even with all those choices.
For home playing and recording, it can be very cool though to have
all those push pulls and multi-switches, 5 way strat style pup selector and
addtional toggles for phase and parallel/series selections.

the main thing (which you pointed at) is if you are going to do all this
then get humbuckers with both sets of poles as screw adjustable.
Yes - they are out there if you look. And of course you can get
indie pup makers to wind you up a custom set with both sets of poles being
screw adjustable (either hex or standard screws).

good luck with it! And be careful how to devise a way to outlay
the physical location of the push pulls, toggles.. etc.
Put them in a place where your hand naturally will find them as you play
and not in the way of each other or too close.. etc...
I had a Strat setup like this (I had it H-S-H) and we wired in 45 unique
pickup combinations (we also used a Fender Super Switch 5 way) and we
used the push in S1 Fender system as our base wiring system. From there
we used push pull pots on the 2 other tone controls (the Fender S1 push switch
sits inside the Volume pot) and then we drilled out 3 more toggles on
the pickguard and then worked in one more toggle).
It had so many different combinations and sounds in there but eventually
I took out the pickguard and just went back to a regular 5 way with HSS (fat strat)
setup. it was all just too much to use in a live band setting where
I needed to be able to quickly and effortlessly switch within a beat
from one selection to the other. In actualy live band setting where
you need to switch quickly - there's too much fumbling around with all
those toggles and switches and selections (imho).

moonpie
2011-02-16 19:18:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues
For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his
hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some
better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal
is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is
probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of
the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
Forgot to add... He was playing a couple of Les Pauls, appeared to be
vintage. I noticed that his neck pickup had the screws in the bridge
orientation. When I experimented with my vintage SG, I put a JB in the
neck position, but flipped it over so that the screws looked right.
Guess I didn't need to do that. (It also has a Seymour Duncan Distortion
in the bridge, so both selections are high output.)
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
nah, thats Peter Greens old les paul that not only had the neck bucker
flipped, but, i think the coils were rewound or reversed or something
crazy,.. so that when both pickups were on, they were out of phase.

Just flipping the position of the neck pickup isnt going to make it
out of phase with the bridge.... is it?
Jim
2011-02-16 19:35:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by moonpie
Post by Jim
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues
For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his
hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some
better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal
is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is
probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of
the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
Forgot to add... He was playing a couple of Les Pauls, appeared to be
vintage. I noticed that his neck pickup had the screws in the bridge
orientation. When I experimented with my vintage SG, I put a JB in the
neck position, but flipped it over so that the screws looked right.
Guess I didn't need to do that. (It also has a Seymour Duncan Distortion
in the bridge, so both selections are high output.)
After watching the Tiny Terror youtube, I now think that Gary used a
neck position 'bucker, and flipped it around to get an out of phase tone
with both pickups selected.
nah, thats Peter Greens old les paul that not only had the neck bucker
flipped, but, i think the coils were rewound or reversed or something
crazy,.. so that when both pickups were on, they were out of phase.
Just flipping the position of the neck pickup isnt going to make it
out of phase with the bridge.... is it?
The wiring would be the same, so no. Don't know what I was thinking,
other than after watching the Tiny Terror I added 2 and 2 and got 5.

I'll use my ear on my SG next time I play. One of the two has a "both
coils parallel." I think I used the distortion bridge.

The JB is an OLD version Seymour Duncan. The strange thing... it hums
a little, where my two newer JB don't hum at all! Early ones seem to
sell for more. I may replace it. I'm in a HORRIBLE location for stray
noise, and the next guy may hear no real hum at all.
Daniel Dreibelbis
2011-02-17 03:09:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've
also read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that
album with the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower
"Blues For Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back
in his hard rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether.
Some better than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the
pedal is the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from
what is probably not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another
example of the "tone is in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones,
some of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
during the time he was mostly using his '63 Strat (around _Corridors
Of Power_ and _Victims Of The Future_), Gary used a Boss DS-1 with it
into a Marshall, he said that it was great for getting a lead tone
while retaining the tonal characteristics of a Strat.

As I've said before, one of my favorite Moore albums that should've
gotten a lot more attention is _Scars_, which had him using mostly a
Strat with tunes in a Hendrix vein - beautiful Strat tone.

there is definitely a worst Moore tone, though - that's on an album
called _G-Force_. For some reason, Gary decided to record the majority
of the solos by running his guitar into a DOD 250 overdrive and then
straight int the board!
Nails on a blackboard, indeed. Too bad, as there's some interesting
songs on that album.
--
Dan Dreibelbis, CGN (Cerified Guitar Nerd)
http://guitarnerd.ca
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=121942
http://www.myspace.com/dandreibelbis
Current Songs - "(You're A) Cry Baby"
Lawrence Logic
2011-02-17 11:25:40 UTC
Permalink
"Daniel Dreibelbis" <***@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:iji3gs$2l3$***@news.eternal-september.org...
<snip>
As I've said before, one of my favorite Moore albums that should've gotten
a lot more attention is _Scars_, which had him using mostly a Strat with
tunes in a Hendrix vein - beautiful Strat tone.
<snip>

I found the Scars CD about nine years ago, not long after it came out. It
was in a bargain bin at a local CD shop and it's one of the best CD's I've
ever bought. It's a blues album, but probably best described as "angry
blues". If anyone here has never heard it, I can highly recommend it.

As per my "angry" comment, this one's not a bad start...


--
Lawrence
"In the outside world I am a simple geologist, but in here I am Falcor,
Defender of the Alliance." - Randy Marsh - 4 October 2006
Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 11:48:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Thanks to this thread I stumbled upon this video. Never heard this one
before or ever saw Gary play an Explorer... but man, what a monster sound.


--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 15:19:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve M. Mann
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Thanks to this thread I stumbled upon this video. Never heard this one
before or ever saw Gary play an Explorer... but man, what a monster sound.
http://youtu.be/mzI2JBSgtzE
I mean wow... Just freakin' WOW. :)
--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
jtees4
2011-02-17 15:55:44 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 05:48:20 -0600, "Steve M. Mann"
Post by Steve M. Mann
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Thanks to this thread I stumbled upon this video. Never heard this one
before or ever saw Gary play an Explorer... but man, what a monster sound.
http://youtu.be/mzI2JBSgtzE
I have liked Gary Moore for a long time...BUT I have discovered so
much more in the last few days searching out videos and other info.
Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 16:34:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by jtees4
On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 05:48:20 -0600, "Steve M. Mann"
Post by Steve M. Mann
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Thanks to this thread I stumbled upon this video. Never heard this one
before or ever saw Gary play an Explorer... but man, what a monster sound.
http://youtu.be/mzI2JBSgtzE
I have liked Gary Moore for a long time...BUT I have discovered so
much more in the last few days searching out videos and other info.
Same here. It's a tragedy that it took his death for this to happen.
--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
jtees4
2011-02-17 15:59:31 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 19:37:03 +0800, "The Interceptor"
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
His 80's Hair Charvel Superstrat days:

Not the best sound quality.
Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 16:36:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by jtees4
On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 19:37:03 +0800, "The Interceptor"
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
http://youtu.be/aJM3A_Y5qyk
Not the best sound quality.
Always loved this song and THIS TONE. He does it better than anyone:



Never much of a blues fan until I heard this years ago.
--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 16:48:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by jtees4
On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 19:37:03 +0800, "The Interceptor"
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
http://youtu.be/aJM3A_Y5qyk
Not the best sound quality.
That is a trip... that's about the time I first got turned on to him.
Back with the song 'Shapes'. Not sure why I didn't become a big fan
then... it was years later, but I tell you.. the guy had an unbelievable
career. Talk about spanning genres.


--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
jtees4
2011-02-17 18:20:15 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 10:48:38 -0600, "Steve M. Mann"
Post by Steve M. Mann
Post by jtees4
On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 19:37:03 +0800, "The Interceptor"
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
http://youtu.be/aJM3A_Y5qyk
Not the best sound quality.
That is a trip... that's about the time I first got turned on to him.
Back with the song 'Shapes'. Not sure why I didn't become a big fan
then... it was years later, but I tell you.. the guy had an unbelievable
career. Talk about spanning genres.
http://youtu.be/QGWdkqDH0XY
This was also a different look and sound for him.

Steve M. Mann
2011-02-17 19:28:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by jtees4
On Thu, 17 Feb 2011 10:48:38 -0600, "Steve M. Mann"
Post by Steve M. Mann
Post by jtees4
On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 19:37:03 +0800, "The Interceptor"
Post by The Interceptor
I'm sure it's been covered before, but Gary Moore's tone warrant some
discussion.
I have read that it was the usual Marshall + Les Paul combo, but I've also
read about the use of a Marshal Guv'nor pedal, and there is that album with
the Line 6 Pod on the back of it.
His "Oh Pretty Woman" style lead tone was fantastic. What is also
interesting is that he had many other tones, such as the mellower "Blues For
Greeny" album tones (lots of that out-of-phase LP) and back in his hard
rock/metal days there were some different tones altogether. Some better
than others, but more often than not very interesting.
The video link posted by jtees4 shows Gary getting a great tone from an
Orange Tiny Terror and some sort of pedal. More important than the pedal is
the fact that he is getting a classic Gary Moore tone from what is probably
not his standard gear. Perhaps this is yet another example of the "tone is
in the fingers" theory.
All I know for certain is that I reckon he had a range of great tones, some
of my favourites.
What are the thoughts out there?
Brett
http://youtu.be/aJM3A_Y5qyk
Not the best sound quality.
That is a trip... that's about the time I first got turned on to him.
Back with the song 'Shapes'. Not sure why I didn't become a big fan
then... it was years later, but I tell you.. the guy had an unbelievable
career. Talk about spanning genres.
http://youtu.be/QGWdkqDH0XY
This was also a different look and sound for him.
http://youtu.be/VS9LZiu19TI
Indeed. The short hair didn't suit him in my opinion. :)

Still lots to learn about Gary, that's for sure.
--
Steve
..............................
P R O J E C T - 4 3
http://www.project-43.com/
The 'Man and Machine' CD Is Out!
Support Indie Music!
http://itunes.com/project-43
..............................
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