Discussion:
completely OT but important question about beer
(too old to reply)
Squier
2008-01-09 04:29:09 UTC
Permalink
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.

Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-09 06:44:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
In Aussie Fosters is considered parrot's water (tho I secretly don't
mind it). That being said Vic Bitter (VB) gets my nomination for the
shittiest beer in Aus. Good beers are rather abundant here, Carlton Cold
or Hahn Ice - cold brewed and not to bad at all. Especially when you are
parched. Boags is also good stuff. Crown lager is good but a bit over
rated. There are probably more good breweries over here than bad ones
mind you.

In New Zealand I like Speights or Steinlager, most of the local not
quite so mass produced stuff is real good. Be wary of DB anything or
Lion anything. Interestingly enough Hahn (Aussie brand) is owned by Lion
Nathan (Kiwi company). It gives you some idea of how much Kiwi's like
beer. We in the antipodes take beer real serious;-)

You 21 yet Squier?

Mark
Pete
2008-01-09 18:23:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
In Aussie Fosters is considered parrot's water (tho I secretly don't mind
it). That being said Vic Bitter (VB) gets my nomination for the shittiest
beer in Aus. Good beers are rather abundant here, Carlton Cold or Hahn
Ice - cold brewed and not to bad at all. Especially when you are parched.
Boags is also good stuff. Crown lager is good but a bit over rated. There
are probably more good breweries over here than bad ones mind you.
In New Zealand I like Speights or Steinlager, most of the local not quite
so mass produced stuff is real good. Be wary of DB anything or Lion
anything. Interestingly enough Hahn (Aussie brand) is owned by Lion Nathan
(Kiwi company). It gives you some idea of how much Kiwi's like beer. We in
the antipodes take beer real serious;-)
You 21 yet Squier?
Mark
Emu export?
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:32:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
In Aussie Fosters is considered parrot's water (tho I secretly don't mind
it). That being said Vic Bitter (VB) gets my nomination for the shittiest
beer in Aus. Good beers are rather abundant here, Carlton Cold or Hahn
Ice - cold brewed and not to bad at all. Especially when you are parched.
Boags is also good stuff. Crown lager is good but a bit over rated. There
are probably more good breweries over here than bad ones mind you.
In New Zealand I like Speights or Steinlager, most of the local not quite
so mass produced stuff is real good. Be wary of DB anything or Lion
anything. Interestingly enough Hahn (Aussie brand) is owned by Lion Nathan
(Kiwi company). It gives you some idea of how much Kiwi's like beer. We in
the antipodes take beer real serious;-)
that an' rootin'.
You 21 yet Squier?
Mark
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 04:38:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
In Aussie Fosters is considered parrot's water (tho I secretly don't mind
it). That being said Vic Bitter (VB) gets my nomination for the shittiest
beer in Aus. Good beers are rather abundant here, Carlton Cold or Hahn
Ice - cold brewed and not to bad at all. Especially when you are parched.
Boags is also good stuff. Crown lager is good but a bit over rated. There
are probably more good breweries over here than bad ones mind you.
In New Zealand I like Speights or Steinlager, most of the local not quite
so mass produced stuff is real good. Be wary of DB anything or Lion
anything. Interestingly enough Hahn (Aussie brand) is owned by Lion Nathan
(Kiwi company). It gives you some idea of how much Kiwi's like beer. We in
the antipodes take beer real serious;-)
that an' rootin'.
See my other post;-) But amen brother....

Mark
Andy
2008-01-09 07:04:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Fosters? Nah, not a fucking chance. IIRC more gets sold in the UK than
does here.

Millers I've tried, and thought were allright. The rest from the US
seems to be watered down piss.

I can second Mark's nomination of VB being the shittiest beer in
Australia.

Most everything from Tasmania is excellent, and I like a Coopers Pale
too.

Andy.
Tad Huggins
2008-01-09 07:23:55 UTC
Permalink
I don't know much about Australian beer. As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I think my favorite beer right now is Heineken. Can never go wrong with a
Heineken. Another favorite of mine is Newcastle. Here in California,
Corona is real popular. But, I never liked Mexican beer that much.
Canadian beer I think is good. Always liked Moose Head. This topic is
making me thirsty, gotta crack open a nice cold Heineken.

Tad
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Dr. Zontar
2008-01-09 11:32:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.

- Rich
VampX
2008-01-09 11:35:48 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers? Where have I
been? I think it's funny how Australia sells Fosters to the rest of the
world coz god knows nobody here drinks that crap. We know where its at
and Fosters aint it.
:)
--
VampX
-----------------------
If you strangled a smurf, what colour would it turn?
Dr. Zontar
2008-01-09 17:41:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by VampX
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers?
2 or 3... depending on who you ask.
Post by VampX
I think it's funny how Australia sells Fosters to the rest of the
world coz god knows nobody here drinks that crap. We know where its at
and Fosters aint it.
The funny thing to me is how it's marketed in the US. The tagline on
the commercials is "Fosters. It's Australian for "beer"". Not exactly
truth in advertising, is it?

- Rich
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 18:08:45 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Jan 2008 09:41:30 -0800 (PST), "Dr. Zontar"
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by VampX
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers?
2 or 3... depending on who you ask.
Post by VampX
I think it's funny how Australia sells Fosters to the rest of the
world coz god knows nobody here drinks that crap. We know where its at
and Fosters aint it.
The funny thing to me is how it's marketed in the US. The tagline on
the commercials is "Fosters. It's Australian for "beer"". Not exactly
truth in advertising, is it?
ha! is that any worse than Coors or Bud waxing philosophic about their
glorious 100+ year old history? Fancy hi dollar advertising aside,
their beer to me is corporate swill.

to each his own
The Repair Guy
2008-01-10 00:03:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by VampX
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers?
Where have I been?
Australia?

The Repair Guy
repairguy1993 dot netfirms dot com
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 00:08:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by VampX
In article
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers? Where have I
been? I think it's funny how Australia sells Fosters to the rest of the
world coz god knows nobody here drinks that crap. We know where its at
and Fosters aint it.
:)
IIRC Fosters is brewed locally. So what they get overseas isn't what we
get here.

There are good US beers easily got over here (tho I drink so many I
couldn't name one;-). My wife will go down and get me a mixed dozen from
around the world. The last one always tastes the best;-)

BTW I don't mind a dark beer either. Or Lagers, or cold brewed, or stout
or.........

Mark
Rufus
2008-01-10 02:11:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by VampX
In article
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
Hang on.. you mean to tell me there are good US beers? Where have I
been? I think it's funny how Australia sells Fosters to the rest of the
world coz god knows nobody here drinks that crap. We know where its at
and Fosters aint it.
:)
Ok, it ain't mass marketed, and you have to go REALLY out of your way to
get it, but the single best American beer I've ever had was Telluride
Rose Ale, straight out of the brewery vat behind the glass over the bar
in Telluride, Colorado.

...and something I've noted in my travels is that NOBODY drinks their
local brew...we have one that I think is pure crap...but the Swiss,
Finns, and Brits all seem to love it for some reason.
--
- Rufus
White Spirit
2008-01-10 11:45:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rufus
...and something I've noted in my travels is that NOBODY drinks their
local brew...
I drink my local brew. The problem is, when it's available everywhere,
you can get bored with it. I like variety.
Grinner
2008-01-09 12:05:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.

- Rich

I liked Coors but it was so low in content. Bud's not bad, nice hops taste
but too watery.
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 15:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
I liked Coors but it was so low in content. Bud's not bad, nice hops taste
but too watery.
Buds got a bunch of corn in the mix, so i was told. Nobody i know here
in the states drinks Fosters. The big oil can is unique but I just
dont like it. Heinekin is popular, has that traditional Dutch tang to
it, like Grolsch... all them dutchy beers are pretty gouda.

Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 17:08:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
Unfortunately, people who frequent those types of places have absolutely
no taste - whether in beer or music.
Dr. Zontar
2008-01-09 17:35:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by White Spirit
Post by RC_Moonpie
Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
Unfortunately, people who frequent those types of places have absolutely
no taste - whether in beer or music.
I live in Rochester, NY - home of the Upper Falls Brewery, maker of
Genesee Beer. Most folks here laugh at "Genny". It's watery, bland and
generally bad (the light version actually tastes better than regular).
Also, it's named after an ugly brown river, which doesn't help.

*BUT* every time I go to Pennsylvania, I'm amazed at how popular it is
down there. Go figure.

- Rich
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 18:09:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Jan 2008 09:35:31 -0800 (PST), "Dr. Zontar"
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by White Spirit
Post by RC_Moonpie
Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
Unfortunately, people who frequent those types of places have absolutely
no taste - whether in beer or music.
I live in Rochester, NY - home of the Upper Falls Brewery, maker of
Genesee Beer. Most folks here laugh at "Genny".
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Dr. Zontar
2008-01-09 21:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.

- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:14:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.

what a job !


- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 04:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)


ROTFLMAO ;-)

Mark
RichL
2008-01-10 04:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 04:53:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
Its not?
RichL
2008-01-10 04:58:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
Its not?
Not if you want a positive response! (at least if you're a bit selective)
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 05:06:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
Its not?
Not if you want a positive response! (at least if you're a bit selective)
Brings back nightmarish memories.....;-)

Mark
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-10 15:30:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
Its not?
Not if you want a positive response! (at least if you're a bit selective)
I knew a guy back in the 80s, the girlies told me he was rather
handsome, but, he told me, that he didnt waste much time either. He'd
go to the pickup joints or bars and within just a few minutes he'd ask
a girl he just met, if she'd go home with him and have sex. He said he
got slapped some, drinks thrown at him, and generally refused pretty
often... but he also said he got yes for an answer a lot as well.

Helps to be extremely cute I suppose.

RichL
2008-01-10 04:55:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
p.s....My bass player back in college days had a theory that if he stood on
a street corner and just came out and asked women straight out as they
passed by, if only one in 100 said yes he'd be ahead of the game and would
be worth the pain of getting slapped etc. I don't know if it actually
worked out for him though!
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 05:05:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
p.s....My bass player back in college days had a theory that if he stood on
a street corner and just came out and asked women straight out as they
passed by, if only one in 100 said yes he'd be ahead of the game and would
be worth the pain of getting slapped etc. I don't know if it actually
worked out for him though!
LOL, I've heard that a few times (No, not been approached;-) but mates
reckoned it worked - bullshit I say;-) its a myth. Not once have I seen
it applied succesfully.

Mark
Grinner
2008-01-10 09:11:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
p.s....My bass player back in college days had a theory that if he stood on
a street corner and just came out and asked women straight out as they
passed by, if only one in 100 said yes he'd be ahead of the game and would
be worth the pain of getting slapped etc. I don't know if it actually
worked out for him though!
LOL, I've heard that a few times (No, not been approached;-) but mates
reckoned it worked - bullshit I say;-) its a myth. Not once have I seen it
applied succesfully.
Depends on looks too I suppose. I heard of a bloke who tried it on the beach
and worked it out to be a 1 in 5 ratio.
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 10:07:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
p.s....My bass player back in college days had a theory that if he stood on
a street corner and just came out and asked women straight out as they
passed by, if only one in 100 said yes he'd be ahead of the game and would
be worth the pain of getting slapped etc. I don't know if it actually
worked out for him though!
LOL, I've heard that a few times (No, not been approached;-) but mates
reckoned it worked - bullshit I say;-) its a myth. Not once have I seen it
applied succesfully.
Depends on looks too I suppose. I heard of a bloke who tried it on the beach
and worked it out to be a 1 in 5 ratio.
That's pretty good odds. But that's the thing, its always "Heard a
bloke". Like the guy who had a threesome. Yeah, right;-)

Mark
Grinner
2008-01-10 10:10:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by RichL
Post by RichL
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by RC_Moonpie
I knew a guy who worked at that brewery. At the time, you could drink
as much as you wanted.... on the job.
Yep. My first wife's brother-in-law worked there back then. Nowadays,
they just give you free beer to take home.
what a job !
- Rich (I might drink it if it's free...)
http://youtu.be/DeWAdzFmI10
ROTFLMAO ;-)
Mark
If only it were that simple, eh? :-)
p.s....My bass player back in college days had a theory that if he stood on
a street corner and just came out and asked women straight out as they
passed by, if only one in 100 said yes he'd be ahead of the game and would
be worth the pain of getting slapped etc. I don't know if it actually
worked out for him though!
LOL, I've heard that a few times (No, not been approached;-) but mates
reckoned it worked - bullshit I say;-) its a myth. Not once have I seen
it applied succesfully.
Depends on looks too I suppose. I heard of a bloke who tried it on the
beach and worked it out to be a 1 in 5 ratio.
That's pretty good odds. But that's the thing, its always "Heard a bloke".
Like the guy who had a threesome. Yeah, right;-)
Mark
Or "back when", "back when I was young and good looking I didn't need to
ask".
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 18:09:20 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 17:08:09 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
Post by RC_Moonpie
Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
Unfortunately, people who frequent those types of places have absolutely
no taste - whether in beer or music.
haha!

welcome to cover band hell, atlanta, georgia.
DS
2008-01-09 18:10:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
welcome to cover band hell, atlanta, georgia.
with a name like RC_moonpie I knew you had to be south of the mason-dixon
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 19:13:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by DS
Post by RC_Moonpie
welcome to cover band hell, atlanta, georgia.
with a name like RC_moonpie I knew you had to be south of the mason-dixon
its not just for breakfast anymore, you know
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:21:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
I liked Coors but it was so low in content. Bud's not bad, nice hops taste
but too watery.
Buds got a bunch of corn in the mix, so i was told. Nobody i know here
in the states drinks Fosters. The big oil can is unique but I just
dont like it. Heinekin is popular, has that traditional Dutch tang to
it, like Grolsch... all them dutchy beers are pretty gouda.
I bought four cases of heineken when they were on special once. I got pretty
sick of them by the end - the taste just got too sweet. I haven't bought
any since. I DO remember the hostels in Holland had their own bars and happy
hour. Draught heineken for a guilder !
Post by RC_Moonpie
Friend of mine went to London recently and said he went into a couple
of trendy clubs where the high rollers wanted the fancy import stuff.
thats right, Budweiser. Heh.
The king of beers?
Rufus
2008-01-10 02:13:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Zontar
Post by Tad Huggins
As for American, I like Sam Adams.
I'll second that. Sam Adams is probably the best mass-market American
beer. I like Watney's (from the UK), but I can't seem to find it
anymore.
- Rich
I liked Coors but it was so low in content. Bud's not bad, nice hops taste
but too watery.
Both are swill...
--
- Rufus
Artnut
2008-01-09 07:45:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
The Indian beer market isn't as bubbly as others like Oz downunder or the US
or even Mexico, if I can say that. No comparison at all with the Europeans.
As far as beers are concerned, they are a cut above the rest.
In recent years, beer has made inroads into some nondescript Indian towns.
The UB group is, perhaps the largest player in Scotch Whisky and beer
production in India and from what I hear is that its ranks second in the
world as far as whisky production is concerned. Kingfisher beer is its
flagship brand and the catchline goes thus "The King of Good Times"
For a long time the Kingfisher brand was associated with the West Indies
Cricket team. It is also the largest selling beer in the Indian market.
However, with the recent entry of Budweiser, I wonder if its has retained
its position. For reasons best known (perhaps hypocritical) the govt doesn't
allow direct advertising of spirits. Hence, the liquor beer manufacturers
resort to surrogate advertising. Fosters is also known brand in India since
many years but now with the ongoing India-Aus Cricket series downunder,
Fosters ads on tv can often be seen.

I have had London Pilsner, Knock-Out, Royal Challenge Indian beer,
Kingfisher, Indian Budweiser and Fosters too. Indian Budweiser is good
enough though I must admit there's slight change, perhaps due to water.
Because I have read that since water consitutes the main element, its
important they get the water from the choicest springs. The Bud here claims
it uses imported hops and other ingredients.

In the US, of course Bud remains the most popular brand but I often wonder
how does Coorslight sell so well unlike the regular Coors! For some reason I
didn't like Coorslight or even Budlight although the subtle rice flavor in
the regular Bud did satisfy my beer tastebuds.

You can go in for Bluemoon Wheat ale or Flying Dog wheat ale or even
SamAdams Hefeweizen which are quite good. If you like to drink like a
connoiseur then maybe Old Peculiar or Lowenbrau or Allagash Dubble ale are
good too.
Grinner
2008-01-09 08:47:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Fosters is shite, although it is made by arguably the best brewery in the
country - Carlton United Brewery. othewr beers by them are Melbourne Bitter,
Carlton Cold and Victoria bitter. Other nice beers are Crown Lager, Resch's
Pilsener and Cooper's Sparkling Ale (which kicks like a mule). There are
range of boutique beers as well James Squier, Boags, Cascade and Hahn.
Toohey's beer has improved significantly in the last ten years. Only
Queenslander's can stomach XXXX.

My favourite of them all is Redback - a wheat beer.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 10:40:23 UTC
Permalink
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from
a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers
are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and
water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it
means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped
through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with
nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale
has a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.

Ale should be served at cellar temperature - never ice cold, but not
warm, contrary to what a lot of Americans appear to believe.
Lager-drinkers tend to complain that ale is flat. Ale-drinkers tend to
complain that lager is filled with gas.

There are some nice lagers and wheat beers, but I like ale best. And,
for the record, Fosters is shit. I understand that Australians won't
touch it at all so it tends to be exported.
Grinner
2008-01-09 12:02:09 UTC
Permalink
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from a
different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers are
lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and water.
No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it means that
the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped through the
pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with nitrogen and
stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has a natural
level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
Ale should be served at cellar temperature - never ice cold, but not warm,
contrary to what a lot of Americans appear to believe. Lager-drinkers tend
to complain that ale is flat. Ale-drinkers tend to complain that lager is
filled with gas.
There are some nice lagers and wheat beers, but I like ale best. And, for
the record, Fosters is shit. I understand that Australians won't touch it
at all so it tends to be exported.
I don't think that's the reason, it's brewed overseas as Foster's draught or
something. it /was/ a good beer when it was being exported in cans,
initially to Vietnam for aussie servicemen. I guess it's name grew and it
was exported and ultimately brewed everywhere. it had a lot to do with a
colourful business man called John Elliott imagining himself an
entrepreneur, he also owned the Carlton Aussie Rules Club. Here it's called
Foster's Lager. Again, it /was/ a good beer - until not long after it
became a tap beer in 1983, Carlton Draught is better on tap. Melbourne
Bitter is probably the best of the three to my taste(VB included), quite
bitter, almost as much as a copper's.
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 15:38:19 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from
a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers
are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and
water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it
means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped
through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with
nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale
has a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
Jim
2008-01-09 15:50:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from
a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers
are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and
water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it
means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped
through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with
nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale
has a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.

In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.

The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that
some of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz
is natural CO2.
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:27:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from
a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers
are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and
water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it
means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped
through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with
nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has
a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.
In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.
The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that some
of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz is
natural CO2.
that's a home brewing method, a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle for final
fermentation and to charge the beer.
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 04:33:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Jim
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from
a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers
are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and
water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it
means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped
through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with
nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has
a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.
In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.
The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that some
of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz is
natural CO2.
that's a home brewing method, a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle for final
fermentation and to charge the beer.
This guys got similar ideas.

http://www.asciimation.co.nz/bender/

Mark
Grinner
2008-01-10 09:21:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Grinner
Post by Jim
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed
from a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental
beers are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops
and water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is
served, it means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and
is pumped through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised,
filled with nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and
body. Ale has a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation
process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.
In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.
The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that
some of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz
is natural CO2.
that's a home brewing method, a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle for final
fermentation and to charge the beer.
This guys got similar ideas.
http://www.asciimation.co.nz/bender/
Mark
Now that is invention !
Mark Bedingfield
2008-01-10 10:08:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Grinner
Post by Jim
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed
from a different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental
beers are lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops
and water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is
served, it means that the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and
is pumped through the pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised,
filled with nitrogen and stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and
body. Ale has a natural level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation
process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.
In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.
The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that
some of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz
is natural CO2.
that's a home brewing method, a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle for final
fermentation and to charge the beer.
This guys got similar ideas.
http://www.asciimation.co.nz/bender/
Mark
Now that is invention !
Told ya Kiwis are serious about Beer;-)

Mark
Grinner
2008-01-10 11:34:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Grinner
Post by Mark Bedingfield
Post by Grinner
Post by Jim
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 10:40:23 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed
from a different type of yeast to lager (most American and
continental beers are lagers) and should be brewed from malted
barley, yeast, hops and water. No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs,
if 'real ale' is served, it means that the ale is unpasteurised,
stored in a casket and is pumped through the pipes with a handpull.
Lager is pasteurised, filled with nitrogen and stored in a keg -
hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has a natural level of carbon
dioxide from the fermentation process.
thanks, i didnt know that. I knew there was real difference in taste
between the lagers and the ales, but didnt know why.
A couple more pieces of useless information: Ales are top fermented.
Lagers are usually chilled when they are fermented.
In the US, bottled beers are generally charged with CO2, not nitrogen.
Even tap beers are mostly CO2. There are some exceptions. One
particularly good local (Seattle) nitrogen beer is Hale's Cream Ale.
The Bridgeport IPA that I mentioned in another post is an example of a
fairly available bottle conditioned India Pale Ale. That means that
some of the fermentation actually happened in the bottle, and the fizz
is natural CO2.
that's a home brewing method, a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle for
final fermentation and to charge the beer.
This guys got similar ideas.
http://www.asciimation.co.nz/bender/
Mark
Now that is invention !
Told ya Kiwis are serious about Beer;-)
'n footy :-)
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:25:55 UTC
Permalink
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from a
different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers are
lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and water.
No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it means that
the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped through the
pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with nitrogen and
stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has a natural
level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
commercially maybe yes, but not traditionally. home brewed lagers are still
carbon dioxide punched. not sure how the cellar process goes over there but
here the kegs are just full of beer and pushed through the lines with a
carbon dioxide keg(s) on the back end. i've had boddingtons a few times out
of a can and that was nitrogen charged. nice beer too.
Ale should be served at cellar temperature - never ice cold, but not warm,
contrary to what a lot of Americans appear to believe. Lager-drinkers tend
to complain that ale is flat. Ale-drinkers tend to complain that lager is
filled with gas.
There are some nice lagers and wheat beers, but I like ale best. And, for
the record, Fosters is shit. I understand that Australians won't touch it
at all so it tends to be exported.
White Spirit
2008-01-10 13:50:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
I drink ale mostly, which is a certain type of beer. Ale is brewed from a
different type of yeast to lager (most American and continental beers are
lagers) and should be brewed from malted barley, yeast, hops and water.
No rice, corn, wheat etc. In pubs, if 'real ale' is served, it means that
the ale is unpasteurised, stored in a casket and is pumped through the
pipes with a handpull. Lager is pasteurised, filled with nitrogen and
stored in a keg - hence, it lacks flavour and body. Ale has a natural
level of carbon dioxide from the fermentation process.
commercially maybe yes, but not traditionally.
Unfortunately, tradition in brewing has only been preserved with ale,
and predominantly English, Scottish and American 'microbrewery' ale at that.
Post by Grinner
home brewed lagers are still
carbon dioxide punched. not sure how the cellar process goes over there but
here the kegs are just full of beer and pushed through the lines with a
carbon dioxide keg(s) on the back end.
You can get 'real lager' here, but not often. For some reason, perhaps
because of lack of lager tradition here, it doesn't work out that well.
Aside from the UK-brewed copies of continental, Australian and
American lagers, there are Samuel Smiths lagers, all original recipies.
The best one is the 'Pure Brewed Lager'. It's basically lager made
English style. Definitely the best lager I've had.
Post by Grinner
i've had boddingtons a few times out
of a can and that was nitrogen charged. nice beer too.
I don't like Boddingtons at all. It's ale made like cheap lager. You
used to be able to get real Boddingtons.
Tim C.
2008-01-10 14:30:19 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 13:50:34 +0000, White Spirit
It's basically lager made English style.
Put like that it sounds awful.
DeeAa
2008-01-10 14:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Guys, have you ever noticed that the beer they sell in various
countries with the same name has very little to do with how that beer
originally tastes like in the place it originates from.

It's the same in cicarrettes.
In Finland, the best tasting cicarrette to me is Marlboro red, but
it's gotta be in soft packs. In hard packs it tastes like crap.
Completely different, but the markings etc. are just the same.

Now where ever I've been over the world, you just don't get that same
taste in Marlboros of any type. You go to Spain on holiday and bring
home a carton of soft-pack Marlboros and you can't even smoke them,
they're completely different.

Same with beer. Here Fosters is quite OK lager I feel suits hot summer
days best. Nothing special.
In Germany I loved Beck's from the tap in one town, somewhere else in
Germany Konigs was way better. Here it tastes like shit when bought in
bottles.

In Belgium I drank Jupiler and some Stella Artois, but neither taste
too good when bought here.

Anyway, when I was in the US I always just bought the cheapest beer I
could find. Honestly I felt all the beer there tasted exactly like the
other, except Miller for instance didn't have much taste at all.
Pretty nice actually for beach drinkin etc. but I like it to have some
taste. No hops, just rye and..beer.

Also some people can't stand their beer warm...I like it in any shape
and temp, except for two: dark beers and ales are no good warm (yeast
starts to taste) and weissbeer is horrid when warm. But pocket-warm
lager goes down very well if need be. It's beer after all, and
whatever brand it is, it's the damned same.

I had this friend who was always raging that brand A and B here were
GREAT and brands C and D were horrid horse-piss.

Guess what happened when we got a bottle of each and made sure they
are the same temp and put him in a blind test?

Yeah, he could not tell the difference AT ALL.

I suspect it's the same with most lagers - if you really take a blind
test with one cold half-decent lager and some others, I'd be willing
to bet 90% of people get 'em all wrong.
DeeAa
2008-01-09 11:02:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
In Finland there's three major breweries that compete with their main
products, all very basic lagers, considered rather good in
international competitions usually. Much like your regular Beck's,
Heineken etc.

My fave and been raising towards market leader is 'Karhu' which means
'bear'. A bit stronger with very little bitterness but more rye taste.
Koff is the more mild version.

Of international beers I like Bishop's Finger ale, several german
Weissbeers and some Czech dark beers like Kozel..yumm.

Don't mind Becks either...german beers are good on tap especially.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 11:45:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by DeeAa
Of international beers I like Bishop's Finger ale, several german
Weissbeers and some Czech dark beers like Kozel..yumm.
Bishop's Finger is a favourite of mine too. Try Hobgoblin if you
haven't already, and Fiddler's Elbow is another favourite.

My absolute favourite is Woodforde's Headcracker. Eight percent alcohol
by volume, and it tastes great.
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 15:39:37 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 11:45:35 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
Try Hobgoblin if you
haven't already,
I didnt like that one too much, too sweet for me. Have you tried Dead
Guy Rogue? thats pretty good
Post by White Spirit
My absolute favourite is Woodforde's Headcracker.
I gotta look for that one.
Jim
2008-01-09 15:51:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 11:45:35 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
Try Hobgoblin if you
haven't already,
I didnt like that one too much, too sweet for me. Have you tried Dead
Guy Rogue? thats pretty good
I just mentioned that in another message. Also try their Shakespeare Stout.
Post by RC_Moonpie
Post by White Spirit
My absolute favourite is Woodforde's Headcracker.
I gotta look for that one.
Grinner
2008-01-09 12:03:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by DeeAa
Post by Squier
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
In Finland there's three major breweries that compete with their main
products, all very basic lagers, considered rather good in
international competitions usually. Much like your regular Beck's,
Heineken etc.
My fave and been raising towards market leader is 'Karhu' which means
'bear'. A bit stronger with very little bitterness but more rye taste.
Koff is the more mild version.
Of international beers I like Bishop's Finger ale, several german
Weissbeers and some Czech dark beers like Kozel..yumm.
Don't mind Becks either...german beers are good on tap especially.
there are laws in gemrany allowing only a few ingredients in the brewing
process. rightly so.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 13:37:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
there are laws in gemrany allowing only a few ingredients in the brewing
process. rightly so.
The Rheinheitsgebot. I think it counts only for beers marketed as
Pilsners. Weissbiers, for example, don't conform to the Rheinheitsgebot.
andy M
2008-01-09 15:48:05 UTC
Permalink
The Rheinheitsgebot.  
No "H". "Reinheitsgebot"
I think it counts only for beers marketed as
Pilsners.  
Nope, it counts for all beer.
Weissbiers, for example, don't conform to the Rheinheitsgebot.
Yes and no. If you take the strict wording of the original, then no,
but "according to the Reinheitsgebot" is often used as an indication
that the drink is brewed using one cereal, water, hops and yeast with
no futher additives.

andy M
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 15:40:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by DeeAa
Post by Squier
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
In Finland there's three major breweries that compete with their main
products, all very basic lagers, considered rather good in
international competitions usually. Much like your regular Beck's,
Heineken etc.
My fave and been raising towards market leader is 'Karhu' which means
'bear'. A bit stronger with very little bitterness but more rye taste.
Koff is the more mild version.
Of international beers I like Bishop's Finger ale, several german
Weissbeers and some Czech dark beers like Kozel..yumm.
Don't mind Becks either...german beers are good on tap especially.
there are laws in gemrany allowing only a few ingredients in the brewing
process. rightly so.
aint that the "german purity law of 1582" or something like that? I've
seen in on the Paulaner bottles.
andy M
2008-01-09 15:50:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC_Moonpie
aint that the "german purity law of 1582" or something like that?
Bavarian Purity Regulation of 1516. It didnt become an actual law
until 1992.


andy M
RichL
2008-01-09 14:06:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Sheeks, where are you, Squier? I hope you're exaggerating!!

In certain places here in Maryland, I'm looked at as a barbarian if I order
a Yuenling or Sam Adams (two of my favorites). The boutique thing is in
full force. But I'll drink a Bud on occasion, too.
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-09 14:32:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Sheeks, where are you, Squier?  I hope you're exaggerating!!
In certain places here in Maryland, I'm looked at as a barbarian if I order
a Yuenling or Sam Adams (two of my favorites).  The boutique thing is in
full force.  But I'll drink a Bud on occasion, too.
Coors Light is what we call "Training Beer", but a LOT of people drink
it. In Texas there are a lot of German immigrant off-spring making
sausage & beer. There used to be a good cheap beer here called
ZeigenBock, but they were bought by a major and now its undrinkable
swill. Some of these locally produced beers are available by the pint
at "brew pubs". People actually go to these kinds of places to avoid
Bud/Miller/Coors and some of the local brews are really good. Shiner
Bock is by far the biggest selling locally produced beer. The old
"regular" Shiner (not the Bock) was such a slow mover that they
couldn't give it away, so Shiner pulled the product, re-labeled it
"Shiner Blonde" with a picture of a blonde cutie on the label, and now
it is a big seller. Same beer. Shiner Bock used to be very cheap,
but when it became "trendy" the price sky-rocketed.
Tim C.
2008-01-09 15:32:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
There used to be a good cheap beer here called
ZeigenBock,
Is/was that a real "Bock" beer? As in about 7%+ ABV? Or is the name
just referring to the "Ziege" ?
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-09 16:35:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim C.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
There used to be a good cheap beer here called
ZeigenBock,
Is/was that a real "Bock" beer? As in about 7%+ ABV? Or is the name
just referring to the "Ziege" ?
Texas produces two popular dark-coloured 'bock'1 beers: Shiner Bock
and Ziegen Bock. Shiner Bock is an actual Texas beer from a Texas
brewing company, the Shiner Brewing Company of Shiner, Texas (Shiner
is located between Dallas and about one hour's drive north of Austin).
Ziegen Bock is its Anheiser-Busch competitor, and is proudly served
only in Texas, but tastes suspiciously like the Michelob Amber Bock
which is sold outside Texas.

In large cities in Texas, these beers are almost as widely available
as Budweiser (brewed by Anheiser-Busch) or Miller Lite, the two
leaders outside Texas. In short, almost every place in Texas sells
this stuff, often on draft, so you can afford to be selective about
where you drink it. In cheap places, it goes for US$1.50 per twelve-
ounce serving. If you pay more than that for it, you'd better be
consciously paying for the atmosphere.

These beers should not be mistaken for German bock beers, which are
much stronger. Texas Bock beers are relatively light-bodied, though
not light-coloured. The combination of light body and flavour makes
these beers somewhat like an English bitter, only watered down and
served ice cold. Given how beastly hot Texas often is, if you find
yourself there, Texas Bock beers can be a pleasant drinking
experience.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Texas Bock should not be mistaken for German bock beers, which are
much stronger. Texas Bock beers are relatively light-bodied, though
not light-coloured. The combination of light body and flavour makes
these beers somewhat like an English bitter, only watered down and
served ice cold. Given how beastly hot Texas often is, if you find
yourself there, Texas Bock beers can be a pleasant drinking
experience.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 17:10:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Texas produces two popular dark-coloured 'bock'1 beers: Shiner Bock
and Ziegen Bock. Shiner Bock is an actual Texas beer from a Texas
brewing company, the Shiner Brewing Company of Shiner, Texas (Shiner
is located between Dallas and about one hour's drive north of Austin).
Ziegen Bock is its Anheiser-Busch competitor, and is proudly served
only in Texas, but tastes suspiciously like the Michelob Amber Bock
which is sold outside Texas.
I lived in Texas for a couple of years and quite liked Shiner Bock. I
also liked Sam Adams.
Tim C.
2008-01-10 09:17:59 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Jan 2008 08:35:32 -0800 (PST), ***@hotmail.com wrote:

Thanks for the info, I know almost bugger-all about American beers.
Post by h***@hotmail.com
These beers should not be mistaken for German bock beers, which are
much stronger. Texas Bock beers are relatively light-bodied, though
not light-coloured.
That's what I was after.
Jim
2008-01-09 14:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Wow. How red ARE their necks? In Seattle, I usually can't count all of
the taps. At the grocery, Sam Adams resides with the Miller, Coors and
Bud. Then you'll see 5 times the shelf space for real beer!
Post by Squier
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
It all depends on your tastes. I was out for dinner Sunday night, and
had Guinness on tap. But if you are use to Miller, it may not be your
style.

A good starting place for somebody not use to "boutique" beers is Sierra
Nevada Pale Ale. If you don't know the difference in ale and lager,
spend 20 minutes on google. It and EXCELLENT mass produced beer that
usually doesn't overpower the novice drinker.

I tend to like hoppy beers. If you don't know what this means, try a
Bridgeport IPA. Don't be afraid of the yeast residue in the bottom of
the bottle. This is REAL beer with fermentation finished in the bottle.
I pour slowly to minimize clouding, but it's not necessary.

A hoppy cheaper beer is the Mission Street Ale available at Trader
Joe's. $5 a six in Seattle, perhaps even less where you live (WA taxes
beer and wine more than most states).

Other good local beers include Mac and Jack's Amber and Manny's Pale
Ale. But I don't think they are widely distributed.

Red Hook is a local brewery that was once boutique, but has been
purchased by anheuser-busch (bud). Quality has suffered a bit with mass
production, but it's still good. Pyramid is a similar story.

Just about anything from Rogue brewery (out of Oregon) is good stuff! I
like their Dead Man Ale and Shakespeare Stout.
Post by Squier
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
My advice is to try a six pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Then see if
you can't find some of the others I mention.
Post by Squier
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 14:55:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
It all depends on your tastes. I was out for dinner Sunday night, and
had Guinness on tap. But if you are use to Miller, it may not be your
style.
Guinness is pig swill. Stout should have lots of flavour but Guinness
has little of it and what there is is incredibly bland. You can really
tell it's been pasteurised and pumped full of nitrogen.
Post by Jim
A good starting place for somebody not use to "boutique" beers is Sierra
Nevada Pale Ale.
I can get that here. It's is nice, although overpriced for us as
imports go. It seems strange to hear people referring to good quality
beer as 'boutique', though.
Post by Jim
I tend to like hoppy beers. If you don't know what this means, try a
Bridgeport IPA. Don't be afraid of the yeast residue in the bottom of
the bottle. This is REAL beer with fermentation finished in the bottle.
We call them 'bottle-conditioned'. Definitely the best way to have
bottled beer.
Post by Jim
I pour slowly to minimize clouding, but it's not necessary.
I pour mine reasonably quickly so that I can get on with drinking it.

I'm already thinking about the beer-run on the way home from work. The
supermarket nearby has some nice ales that I don't find in my local
supermarket.

Can anyone recommend any places to get decent beer in New York? I'm
going in a couple of months time and I always try to sample as many of
the local beers as I can.
Jim
2008-01-09 15:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by White Spirit
Post by Jim
It all depends on your tastes. I was out for dinner Sunday night, and
had Guinness on tap. But if you are use to Miller, it may not be your
style.
Guinness is pig swill. Stout should have lots of flavour but Guinness
has little of it and what there is is incredibly bland. You can really
tell it's been pasteurised and pumped full of nitrogen.
I think it has a good flavor. I don't know of a better, more available
stout. And realize I'm talking on tap, NOT bottled or canned.

When I go to a local brew pub, my first question is always "do you have
any cask conditioned?" This is real beer that tends to be on the flat
side, but it is live beer!
Post by White Spirit
Post by Jim
A good starting place for somebody not use to "boutique" beers is
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale.
I can get that here. It's is nice, although overpriced for us as
imports go. It seems strange to hear people referring to good quality
beer as 'boutique', though.
I generally use the term "microbrew," but others used the boutique term
and musicians are familiar with it.
Post by White Spirit
Post by Jim
I tend to like hoppy beers. If you don't know what this means, try a
Bridgeport IPA. Don't be afraid of the yeast residue in the bottom of
the bottle. This is REAL beer with fermentation finished in the bottle.
We call them 'bottle-conditioned'. Definitely the best way to have
bottled beer.
Post by Jim
I pour slowly to minimize clouding, but it's not necessary.
I pour mine reasonably quickly so that I can get on with drinking it.
I'm already thinking about the beer-run on the way home from work. The
supermarket nearby has some nice ales that I don't find in my local
supermarket.
Can anyone recommend any places to get decent beer in New York? I'm
going in a couple of months time and I always try to sample as many of
the local beers as I can.
White Spirit
2008-01-09 15:36:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
Post by White Spirit
Guinness is pig swill. Stout should have lots of flavour but Guinness
has little of it and what there is is incredibly bland. You can
really tell it's been pasteurised and pumped full of nitrogen.
I think it has a good flavor. I don't know of a better, more available
stout. And realize I'm talking on tap, NOT bottled or canned.
It's tastes that way to me on tap as well. Even when I tried it in
Dublin, it was the same. It's served from a keg anyway, so it's still
pasteurised and full of nitrogen.
Post by Jim
When I go to a local brew pub, my first question is always "do you have
any cask conditioned?" This is real beer that tends to be on the flat
side, but it is live beer!
Here, if a pub doesn't have cask ale, I don't want to drink there. Btw,
it's not flat. It has a natural amount of carbon dioxide from primary
and secondary fermentation.
Jim
2008-01-09 15:45:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by White Spirit
Post by Jim
Post by White Spirit
Guinness is pig swill. Stout should have lots of flavour but
Guinness has little of it and what there is is incredibly bland. You
can really tell it's been pasteurised and pumped full of nitrogen.
I think it has a good flavor. I don't know of a better, more
available stout. And realize I'm talking on tap, NOT bottled or canned.
It's tastes that way to me on tap as well. Even when I tried it in
Dublin, it was the same. It's served from a keg anyway, so it's still
pasteurised and full of nitrogen.
Post by Jim
When I go to a local brew pub, my first question is always "do you
have any cask conditioned?" This is real beer that tends to be on the
flat side, but it is live beer!
Here, if a pub doesn't have cask ale, I don't want to drink there. Btw,
it's not flat. It has a natural amount of carbon dioxide from primary
and secondary fermentation.
It is flat in comparison to typical U.S. fare. I know my beers, and
have even made beer and wine in the past. To a person who regularly
drinks REAL beer (like yourself), I'm sure you find the U.S. bottled
stuff overly lively (in carbonation, that is).
White Spirit
2008-01-09 18:01:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
Post by White Spirit
Post by Jim
When I go to a local brew pub, my first question is always "do you
have any cask conditioned?" This is real beer that tends to be on
the flat side, but it is live beer!
Here, if a pub doesn't have cask ale, I don't want to drink there.
Btw, it's not flat. It has a natural amount of carbon dioxide from
primary and secondary fermentation.
It is flat in comparison to typical U.S. fare. I know my beers, and
have even made beer and wine in the past. To a person who regularly
drinks REAL beer (like yourself), I'm sure you find the U.S. bottled
stuff overly lively (in carbonation, that is).
It fares about the same when compared to keg and canned lager. In some
cases, overly lively would be a polite way of putting it :)

The reason I mentioned that the real beer is not flat is because, having
a natural amount of gas, for me it is the reference by which other beers
are judged. I look at other beers as being artificially gassy.
Tim C.
2008-01-09 15:33:20 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jan 2008 14:55:41 +0000, White Spirit
Post by White Spirit
Guinness is pig swill. Stout should have lots of flavour but Guinness
has little of it and what there is is incredibly bland. You can really
tell it's been pasteurised and pumped full of nitrogen
Guinness just tastes bitter to me. Hate it.
Give me any other stout, yummy.
LULU
2008-01-09 14:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere.   We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ?  just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking.  This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Squier et al . . .

. . . I tend to prefer ale to beer but, have learned not to be overly
critical or picky about what's available. Here's what I like in no
particular order:

Delirium Tremens - Belgian golden ale - 9% ABV
Oranjeboom - Dutch lager with strong malt flavor - 5% ABV
Warsteiner - German pilsner, smooth - <5% ABV
Samuel Adams Black Lager - <5% ABV
Whitbread Ale - readily available - 5.7% ABV
Bass Pale Ale - brewed since 1777 - 5% ABV
Carlsberg Elephant Malt - not the best but, I've drank a bit of it -
7.2% ABV
Gouden Carolus Noel - Belgian ale, Anker Brewery - 10.5% ABV

Etc., etc., etc. There are thousands of good and bad beers, ales and
malts. Everybody likes something different. I've drank Budweiser all
over the world and would never turn one down if I wanted a brew that
was consistent and familiar. Being adventurous, I usually try
whatever is local and new to me. I spend most winters in Arizona and
there are a bunch of mini-breweries here. You can get a free tee-
shirt if you sample all the offerings at many of these
establishments. I feel that you're much more likely to get arrested
for DUI, as Arizona has about the strictest drinking and driving laws
in the USA. If you drink, don't drive. It's stupid and it can turn
into a tragedy in a heartbeat. Designate a driver and spare yourself
and others the consequences of over indulgence.

I like beer,
Lulu : )
Jim
2008-01-09 15:08:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by LULU
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Squier et al . . .
. . . I tend to prefer ale to beer but, have learned not to be overly
critical or picky about what's available. Here's what I like in no
Delirium Tremens - Belgian golden ale - 9% ABV
Oranjeboom - Dutch lager with strong malt flavor - 5% ABV
Warsteiner - German pilsner, smooth - <5% ABV
Samuel Adams Black Lager - <5% ABV
Whitbread Ale - readily available - 5.7% ABV
Bass Pale Ale - brewed since 1777 - 5% ABV
Carlsberg Elephant Malt - not the best but, I've drank a bit of it -
7.2% ABV
I would drink that years ago, on occasion. More recently, a "discount"
grocery near us has been carrying the tall cans for $4 a four pack. So
I pick it up every once in a while. It don't find it as appealing as I
did years ago, but it's still an interesting brew.
Post by LULU
Gouden Carolus Noel - Belgian ale, Anker Brewery - 10.5% ABV
Etc., etc., etc. There are thousands of good and bad beers, ales and
malts. Everybody likes something different. I've drank Budweiser all
over the world and would never turn one down if I wanted a brew that
was consistent and familiar. Being adventurous, I usually try
whatever is local and new to me. I spend most winters in Arizona and
there are a bunch of mini-breweries here. You can get a free tee-
shirt if you sample all the offerings at many of these
establishments. I feel that you're much more likely to get arrested
for DUI, as Arizona has about the strictest drinking and driving laws
in the USA. If you drink, don't drive. It's stupid and it can turn
into a tragedy in a heartbeat. Designate a driver and spare yourself
and others the consequences of over indulgence.
I like beer,
Lulu : )
http://home.kc.rr.com/emison/Homer_mbeer.mp3

or, if you're REALLY thirsty:
http://home.kc.rr.com/emison/Homer_kill_for_beer.mp3

I also like beer, but I don't drink to excess. I'll have either a beer
or glass of wine with dinner, and sometimes a second glass after dinner.

Read this tonight, while you're raising your pint glass:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080109081236.htm

"People who neither drink alcohol nor exercise have a 30-49 per cent
higher risk of heart disease than those who either drink, exercise or both."

But I have to honestly say, if I was limited to mass produces US beers
like Miller, Coors, Bud... ...I'd do without.
Vince Hradil
2008-01-09 16:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by LULU
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Squier et al . . .
. . . I tend to prefer ale to beer but, have learned not to be overly
critical or picky about what's available. Here's what I like in no
Delirium Tremens - Belgian golden ale - 9% ABV
Oranjeboom - Dutch lager with strong malt flavor - 5% ABV
Warsteiner - German pilsner, smooth - <5% ABV
Samuel Adams Black Lager - <5% ABV
Whitbread Ale - readily available - 5.7% ABV
Bass Pale Ale - brewed since 1777 - 5% ABV
Carlsberg Elephant Malt - not the best but, I've drank a bit of it -
7.2% ABV
Gouden Carolus Noel - Belgian ale, Anker Brewery - 10.5% ABV
Etc., etc., etc. There are thousands of good and bad beers, ales and
malts. Everybody likes something different. I've drank Budweiser all
over the world and would never turn one down if I wanted a brew that
was consistent and familiar. Being adventurous, I usually try
whatever is local and new to me. I spend most winters in Arizona and
there are a bunch of mini-breweries here. You can get a free tee-
shirt if you sample all the offerings at many of these
establishments. I feel that you're much more likely to get arrested
for DUI, as Arizona has about the strictest drinking and driving laws
in the USA. If you drink, don't drive. It's stupid and it can turn
into a tragedy in a heartbeat. Designate a driver and spare yourself
and others the consequences of over indulgence.
I like beer,
Lulu : )
Good choices all - btw, ales ARE beers.
jthread
2008-01-09 14:48:09 UTC
Permalink
I'm a beer snob. I love pale ales.

Dos XX or Heineken Light are my first choices. I almost never drink
domestic. Molson and Moose Head are really good Canadian beers. If you can
find it Kokanee from the Kokanee Glacier in British Columbia is really good.
Reminds me of Coors but a lot better. I think it's only available in the NE
USA. I drink Kokanee when ever I'm up in that area. Cheap too. Every once in
a while I'll have a bud or miller light. Sort of a guilty pleasure. It's my
Big Mac.

jim
Jim
2008-01-09 15:18:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by jthread
I'm a beer snob. I love pale ales.
Dos XX or Heineken Light are my first choices. I almost never drink
domestic. Molson and Moose Head are really good Canadian beers. If you can
find it Kokanee from the Kokanee Glacier in British Columbia is really good.
Reminds me of Coors but a lot better. I think it's only available in the NE
USA. I drink Kokanee when ever I'm up in that area. Cheap too. Every once in
a while I'll have a bud or miller light. Sort of a guilty pleasure. It's my
Big Mac.
jim
Those are all lagers, and light tasting ones at that. (European lagers
or microbrew US lagers are MUCH better.)

Try a six pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, green label.

Loading Image...

It's out of Chico, California, and should be readily available in most
markets. It is a medium body ale, not too hoppy or bitter.
Consistently good, easy to find.
jthread
2008-01-09 16:01:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by jthread
I'm a beer snob. I love pale ales.
Dos XX or Heineken Light are my first choices. I almost never drink
domestic. Molson and Moose Head are really good Canadian beers. If you
can find it Kokanee from the Kokanee Glacier in British Columbia is
really good. Reminds me of Coors but a lot better. I think it's only
available in the NE USA. I drink Kokanee when ever I'm up in that area.
Cheap too. Every once in a while I'll have a bud or miller light. Sort of
a guilty pleasure. It's my Big Mac.
jim
Those are all lagers, and light tasting ones at that. (European lagers or
microbrew US lagers are MUCH better.)
Try a six pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, green label.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y276/pantomus/SierraNevadaPaleAle.jpg
It's out of Chico, California, and should be readily available in most
markets. It is a medium body ale, not too hoppy or bitter. Consistently
good, easy to find.
Yeah your right I meant lager. I don't like pale ale.

I've had SNPA and i didn't like it.

Thanks for pointing that out. <g>

jim
jimmy
2008-01-09 15:27:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by jthread
I'm a beer snob. I love pale ales.
Dos XX or Heineken Light are my first choices. I almost never drink
domestic. Molson and Moose Head are really good Canadian beers.
I was weaned on Molson Ex and I can smell the Moosehead brewery from
here....truly blessed.

Short beer story: Allentown, PA. I'm looking for a place to buy beer
& finally wander into a big warehouse type place that sells beer,
smokes & candy. There's a mountain of pallettes full of "Mexican
Style" beer near the cash. $4.95 / 24 cans. I buy 48 & take 'em back
to my hotel. Much to my delight it was brewed in Canada by some
brewery near Niagara Falls. One of my better days.

tony
Post by jthread
If you can
find it Kokanee from the Kokanee Glacier in British Columbia is really good.
Reminds me of Coors but a lot better. I think it's only available in the NE
USA. I drink Kokanee when ever I'm up in that area. Cheap too. Every once in
a while I'll have a bud or miller light. Sort of a guilty pleasure. It's my
Big Mac.
jim
Jim
2008-01-09 15:42:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by jimmy
Post by jthread
I'm a beer snob. I love pale ales.
Dos XX or Heineken Light are my first choices. I almost never drink
domestic. Molson and Moose Head are really good Canadian beers.
I was weaned on Molson Ex and I can smell the Moosehead brewery from
here....truly blessed.
Short beer story: Allentown, PA. I'm looking for a place to buy beer
& finally wander into a big warehouse type place that sells beer,
smokes & candy. There's a mountain of pallettes full of "Mexican
Style" beer near the cash. $4.95 / 24 cans. I buy 48 & take 'em back
to my hotel. Much to my delight it was brewed in Canada by some
brewery near Niagara Falls. One of my better days.
tony
I'm not a fan of Canadian beers. True Canada beer story, happened YEARS
ago:

My wife and I were driving the Trans Canada highway, and stopped for the
night in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. I had just had a hassle with a
reservation with the room I called ahead for. I was not in a
particularly good mood. We're hungry, want something easy, so we go
into a local pizza joint. Not being a fan of Canadian beer, I see
Lowenbrau on the menu for not much more. Expecting the U.S. variety, or
maybe a Canadian cousin, we order a couple.

The waitress comes back, and very apologetically serves us a couple of
Lowenbrau Zurich, telling us that usually have the "normal" type. I
kind of laughed, and told her that the import is WAY better, and Zurich
is an unusual one at that.

Unless it has changed, U.S. "Lowenbrau" is made by Miller. They can
glue on a label, but it AIN'T the same as the real Munich beer, or the
Zurich, for that matter.
Post by jimmy
Post by jthread
If you can
find it Kokanee from the Kokanee Glacier in British Columbia is really good.
Reminds me of Coors but a lot better. I think it's only available in the NE
USA. I drink Kokanee when ever I'm up in that area. Cheap too. Every once in
a while I'll have a bud or miller light. Sort of a guilty pleasure. It's my
Big Mac.
jim
Tim C.
2008-01-10 09:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim
The waitress comes back, and very apologetically serves us a couple of
Lowenbrau Zurich, telling us that usually have the "normal" type. I
kind of laughed, and told her that the import is WAY better, and Zurich
is an unusual one at that.
Lol. Apologising for having the real thing.
You're telling me. I didn't know they made it there.
RC_Moonpie
2008-01-09 15:33:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
I like ales, preferably the darker ones, altho those can get sweet.
Newcastle's a favorite. I also dig the Belgian Golden Ales but those
are really expensive. A nice stout occassionally. Paulen Oktoberfest
is a rare treat. Sammy Adams Boston Lager is pretty good when nothing
else is available, for a mass produced US swill, its not bad. Worse
comes to worse I'll drink Michelob AmberBock. Lately at the bars I'll
drink one beer setting up, one during the second set.. and then after
that, all night, its Kaliber or O Douls or whatever non-alcoholic cold
swill they have. Yuck. But its way better than a night in jail.
Tim C.
2008-01-09 15:30:00 UTC
Permalink
Now living in Austria I can't get my favourite British beers
(Felinfoel Double Dragon, Marston's Pedigree, Breakspear's) so I've
learned to like the beers here (not a hard job as they're pretty
good).

imo, German beers tend to be hoppier whereas Austrian beers are
slightly less bitter. My regular brands are Gösser, Puntigammer, and
when I can get it Kapsreiter Landbier and Wieselburger. If I'm feeling
strong enough then the real Budwieser (might be known as Budvar where
you are) is the thing.
I regularly drink any of the wheat beers (weizen-/weissbier) either
clear, dark or yeast from Edelweiss or Erdinger. Makes you fart
though.
Flinstoneyerfired
2008-01-09 15:43:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere.   We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ?  just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking.  This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Well, I'm not really that picky, to be honest. My brother is the beer
afficianado and I've tried some proffered by him that have been great.
Most of the time though, it's either Bud, Coors Light (the wife likes
it) or Molson Canadian. I don't know the proper way to serve it, but I
like it ice cold- on the verge of freezing. When I was younger,
nothing beat an ice cold beer in an air conditioned bar after a
sweltering shift of back-breaking labour. I'm getting thirsty just
talking about it.

Mike
Geetar Dave
2008-01-09 16:27:00 UTC
Permalink
My wife bought me a beer-brewing kit for Christmas, so I'm learning
how to make beer. Interesting stuff. My first batch is gonna get moved
to its secondary fermentation stage (and containers) next weekend, I
think.

Stuff I buy at the local store:
Dos Equis Dark, Blue Moon (wife loves this), or Killians (used to be
much better), or something that looks interesting.

Recent wonderful discovery: Xingu, a Portugese beer that is as dark as
Guinness without any bitterness. Fantastic.

Beer I buy at the corner gas station: Red Dog- $6.29 for 12 bottles.
Used to be $5.99, and is certainly better than the Bud/Miller/Coors
alternatives IMHO.

-dave-----:::
www.myspace.com/geetardave
jthread
2008-01-09 17:36:21 UTC
Permalink
Talking about beer is very relaxing. Maybe we should start a beer ng and ot:
guitars. <g>

jim
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:30:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by jthread
Talking about beer is very relaxing. Maybe we should start a beer ng and
ot: guitars. <g>
there's already beer groups, home brewing at least.
Post by jthread
jim
DS
2008-01-09 18:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
As noted by others, Samuel Adams is the best mass market American beer.
(I'd say that even if I weren't related to Samuel)
In fact, they make a really good variety of styles; none of them bad.

As for being concerned about what other people think of what you're
drinking... well, you know what to think about that already.

Shiner Bock from Texas is pretty good. It's my main source of sustenance
when I'm in Austin. (that and Saltgrass steaks)

You really should try some good Belgian brews including a couple of
Lambics. They're quite different from any other beers you'll encounter.
RichCI
2008-01-09 18:23:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
I'm jumping in late and haven't read the rest of the thread but...

I live in the US and for American beer, I like Miller Genuine Draft
(a.k.a. "MGD") most of the time (Friday nights with friends and band
practice). I appreciate different types of beer but I'm not a snob
when it comes to beer either although I really don't care for Coors as
it doesn't even taste like beer to me (it's almost sweet tasting).
Others I particularly like are Negro Modello, Stella Artois, Becks,
Guinness Stout, Harp, Murphy's Irish Stout and even good ol'
Budweiser. A lot of it depends on what I'm in the mood for and the
weather (I don't care for the heavier beers during the summer).
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-09 19:16:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichCI
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere.   We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ?  just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking.  This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
I'm jumping in late and haven't read the rest of the thread but...
I live in the US and for American beer, I like Miller Genuine Draft
(a.k.a. "MGD") most of the time (Friday nights with friends and band
practice).  I appreciate different types of beer but I'm not a snob
when it comes to beer either although I really don't care for Coors as
it doesn't even taste like beer to me (it's almost sweet tasting).
Others I particularly like are Negro Modello, Stella Artois, Becks,
Guinness Stout, Harp, Murphy's Irish Stout  and even good ol'
Budweiser.  A lot of it depends on what I'm in the mood for and the
weather (I don't care for the heavier beers during the summer).- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Yeah, the weather... when it's cold outside, I'll go for Moosehead.
If it's hot, it is not my favorite.

Once I was down in Nueavo Laredo, it was hot, and I was absolutely
parched. Some locals had a beer-stand w/Negro Modello for sale. Me &
my wife-to-be popped down a buck each and the senorita pulled 2 icy
bottles of the Negro Modello out of a cooler full of ice, poured them
into a large plastic cup and then squeezed a half key lime into each
one (using what looked like a rounded garlic press...the half key lime
fit in there perfect).

That was in '95 and today we still talk about that being the best beer
we ever had. We drank it down & quickly ordered another. Ahhhh....
White Spirit
2008-01-10 06:40:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichCI
Others I particularly like are Negro Modello, Stella Artois,
Here, Stella Artois is sometimes referred to as 'Wife-beater'. Among
the working class, it is sometimes referred to as 'Nelson Mandela'.
Post by RichCI
Becks,
A German friend once described it as 'Bavarian pisswater'. It's not as
nice as Löwenbräu. (The thing about Löwenbräu that is particularly
amusing is asking for it the way it is supposed to be pronounced. One
time in ten they'll realise what you want).
Post by RichCI
Guinness Stout,
I wouldn't call it stout. It's been fortified with nitrogen. When
you've tried a real stout, Guinness just doesn't come close.
Post by RichCI
Harp,
Irish pisswater.
Post by RichCI
Murphy's Irish Stout
As bad as Guinness. We have an ale that is just as bad called John
Smiths. All foam and no flavour.
Post by RichCI
and even good ol'
Budweiser.
Watered down pisswater.
Post by RichCI
A lot of it depends on what I'm in the mood for and the
weather (I don't care for the heavier beers during the summer).
Yeah, in heavier weather sometimes something lighter is called for.
Perhaps a Budvar, or some strong Polish lager like Lech, Zywiec, Okocim,
Zubr or suchlike. For the really strong ones, you have to go to Poland.
You can get pissed for a fiver there.
mcnews
2008-01-09 19:53:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
give tsing toa a try if you like your beer dry.
also warsteiner is very good.
Patrick Keenan
2008-01-09 20:20:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
Given the choice I will order Molson Export. However, for some reason,
this is often not availble in southern Ontario, while it's very easy to get
in Northern Ontario. In Ontario, outside of bars or other licensed
establishments, you can only buy beer in the Brewer's Retail (monopoply)
stores or the Liquor Control Board of Ontario stores (LCBO, monopoly).
Many LCBO's don't stock Export now.

In restaurants I hear "sorry, we don't stock that", "we just ran out", or
"Bless you! My dad drinks that! We don't have it". And despite its name,
it isn't exported.

So I'll have a Canadian or a Stella or an Erland.

HTH
-pk
Eggs Zachtly
2008-01-09 22:16:51 UTC
Permalink
<spacesnip>
Cool thread, man. Nice change of pace. =)

Of all the beers I've had, the one I miss the most is a nice cold San
Miguel. Not the crap they export to the states, it's gotta be 5 per cent.
Over there, it's not regulated. I've gone to the same bar, two nights in a
row, sat at the same stool... the first night, i drank about a case, didn't
catch a buzz... second night I had six bottles and fell flat on my face. =)
I think it's anywhere from 0-30 per cent, or so I was told.

Ahh... Angeles City...
--
Eggs


A foolproof method for sculpting an elephant: first, get a huge block of
marble, then you chip away everything that doesn't look like an elephant.
Grinner
2008-01-10 04:32:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
all this beer talk has inspired me deeply... to go and get a mixed dozen.
Artnut
2008-01-10 07:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grinner
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Feel free to clip out the above in any reply and get right to the
beers.
all this beer talk has inspired me deeply... to go and get a mixed dozen.
Although the subject of this post is 'completely OT', looking at the various
responses, am left wondering if indeed it is OT, leave alone completely OT.
I have also realized that guitar goes down well with beer.

Cheers all..........

Arty
n***@wt.net
2008-01-10 12:41:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Squier
Ok - I do not drink much but like a nice cold beer every so often.
Here in US we have mass market beers like Budweiser, Coors and Miller.
They are not necessarily yhe best brews the US has to offer but they
are everywhere. We even get "fosters" advertising here in US and
is this mass market beer in Australia (kinda the Budweiser for Aussies).
Foster Oil cans... I've drank a load of those in my days, and yes,
I think it must be parrot piss judging by the generally rank taste.
The only reason I used to grab them was they were the biggest
single can I could grab.. Taste was not a factor obviously.. :(
Post by Squier
The advertising would have me think it is what real Aussies drink.
And the same goes for Molson for Canadians.
Some Molson is not too bad... Could do worse..
Post by Squier
But here in US there are places if you don't order a Bud or Coors
and order some boutique beer then you're gonna get beat up in a hurry.
Hah!, that will be the day.. No one has ever tried to kick my ass
cuz of the beer I've ordered.. I could give a rats heiney what anyone
thinks about anything I do... Pressing the issue could be hazardous
to the pressers health... I'll take the bottle of whatever brew I'm
quaffing, and slam it over the head of the presser... We'll see
if he likes my brand after that... I'll ask him, hey butthead,
did you like texture of the bottle? Was the glass hard enough for you?
:/
Post by Squier
Anyways - I thought I would ask here since this is an international
group (DeeA - what the heck is a good beer over there too?) and it
would be nice to know what people consider good beers from where they live
rather than just the mass market beers I see on the TV or print advertising.
Ok - maybe Fosters is actually good ? just because it is mass market
beer doesn't mean it's bad. (or Bud or Coors or whatever).
It is though... Fosters has to be one of the nastiest tasting beers
I've
ever drank... No joke... And I've tried most all of them...
After all, I used to own a bar at one time, and we sold all that
crap..
Post by Squier
And yeah one's person's good stuff is another person's swill.
So don't just say what you think sounds acceptable - let me know what
you actually enjoy drinking. This way I know what to try along the way
and not waste my money on some expensive 6 pack of junk.
And yeah I am recently 21 so it's all legal here.
Some of my fav's are English beers.. Some of the German beers
are pretty good. I used to like heinekin dark, but they changed
the recipe and it's not as good as it once used to be..
Various Ales are probably my fav's.. I've had homebrew Ale
that kicked butt on anything you would buy in a store.
I used to drink a lot of moosehead at one time..
I used to really like Whitbread Ale, but it's hard to find..
It's from England...
But alas, my beer taster days are basically over..
I don't drink much any more. I might have a couple every
once in a while, when under the clinical supervision of a
doktor..
But if I do, it won't be Bud, Miller, etc..
Usually a higher end U.S brand being I'm getting cheap..
IE: sometimes I'll get Killians Irish red, or maybe
Michelob amber bock, and there is another brand of Ale
I like, but forgot the name.. Honey Ale or something like
that... It's pretty good, but hard to find in many stores..
I've always liked dark beers, and I'll usually pick a dark
vs a lager if I had my choice.
I'll still drink a heiney dark, as it's still drinkable, but
like I say it's not near as good as it once was about
25-30 years ago..
MK
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